African American Struggle For Equality Essay

The American Historical Review

Description:The American Historical Review (AHR) is the official publication of the American Historical Association (AHA). The AHA was founded in 1884 and chartered by Congress in 1889 to serve the interests of the entire discipline of history. Aligning with the AHA’s mission, the AHR has been the journal of record for the historical profession in the United States since 1895—the only journal that brings together scholarship from every major field of historical study. The AHR is unparalleled in its efforts to choose articles that are new in content and interpretation and that make a contribution to historical knowledge. The journal also publishes approximately one thousand book reviews per year, surveying and reporting the most important contemporary historical scholarship in the discipline.

Coverage: 1895-2012 (Vol. 1, No. 1 - Vol. 117, No. 5)

Moving Wall: 5 years (What is the moving wall?)

The "moving wall" represents the time period between the last issue available in JSTOR and the most recently published issue of a journal. Moving walls are generally represented in years. In rare instances, a publisher has elected to have a "zero" moving wall, so their current issues are available in JSTOR shortly after publication.
Note: In calculating the moving wall, the current year is not counted.
For example, if the current year is 2008 and a journal has a 5 year moving wall, articles from the year 2002 are available.

Terms Related to the Moving Wall
Fixed walls: Journals with no new volumes being added to the archive.
Absorbed: Journals that are combined with another title.
Complete: Journals that are no longer published or that have been combined with another title.

ISSN: 00028762

EISSN: 19375239

Subjects: History, American Studies, History, Area Studies

Collections: Arts & Sciences I Collection, JSTOR Essential Collection

The African American People's Fight For Equality

The Civil Rights Movement is the story of the struggle of African-American people and their fight for equality. Although exceptional leaders such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, and Ralph Abernathy fought long and hard and carried the burden of the movement on their shoulders, they were not alone. The struggle was fueled by the commitment and the hard work of thousands of everyday people who decided that the time had come to take a stand.
The fight for equal educational opportunities for African-American students has left its indelible mark on the history of the state of Alabama. Alabama fought to maintain its binary public educational system. Through numerous memorable demonstrations and landmark cases African-Americans were finally able to achieve its worthwhile goal of equal education.
Education played a very important part in civil rights history. Much time and effort has been spent on education for the black community. It was only right and fair that all people regardless of skin color be granted an equal opportunity to earn a decent education. Protests and other events that took place on the campuses of educational institutions all over the United States have made national headlines. The issue of equality in regards to educational has remained at the vanguard of the civil rights movement long after these events took place. By taking a glance at the changes in education between the 1950s and

the 2000s, we will be able to see what effect the Civil Rights Movement has had on the educational system of Alabama.
Segregation and racism were most widely applied in education. In the South, schools’ finances were a contributor in the problem of civil rights and equal education. The schools that received the lowest amount of financial assistance were located in the less affluent areas. Coincidentally, this problem became a growing concern for many people. Although this problem was more prevalent in the South, it was not only restricted to the
Southern states. Within the South, the ideology that was indoctrinated was that in order to keep the natural order of society, African-Americans should be keep un-educated. An educated African-American could become a danger and a threat to the way of life for many whites in the South. Some people clung to the belief that African-Americans were incapable of learning anything other that the most rudimentary facts and so any attempt at a proper education was a wasted effort. The despicable and long tolerated “Jim Crow Laws” hung ominously over the South like storm clouds threatening to burst into a tornadic rage at any given moment. The name Jim Crow is a label that was given to the segregation laws enacted by state lawmakers, mainly in the South. Although these laws were in place to prohibit African-American citizens in many areas of daily life, a key factor was education. Education is the doorway to improving one’s life. Without a good education no one could advance themselves in...

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